Andreas Albrectsen – Drawings

from Saturday, September 10th, 2011 to Saturday, October 8th, 2011

Drawings
10 September – 8 October 2011

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Drawings - Press release

"Place de l´Europe" 2011

"Room 902" 2011 Graphite on paper

"Atop a skyscraper" 2011

exhibition view Andreas Albrectsen

exhibition view Andreas Albrectsen

exhibition view Andreas Albrectsen

exhibition view Andreas Albrectsen

exhibition view Andreas Albrectsen

"Place de l´Europe" 2011

"Room 902" 2011 Graphite on paper

"Atop a skyscraper" 2011

exhibition view Andreas Albrectsen

exhibition view Andreas Albrectsen

exhibition view Andreas Albrectsen

exhibition view Andreas Albrectsen

exhibition view Andreas Albrectsen

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Drawings

Parallel to the exhibition of Hans Broek we present a selection of recent works on paper by Andreas Albrectsen (1986 Copenhagen). Albrectsen graduated this year from the Gerrit Rietveld Academie and is set to begin a two-year postgraduate course at the renowned master’s programme of Malmo art college, Sweden.

Albrectsen makes small drawings on large surfaces, inspired by seminal images in the history of photography. With one significant departure: he omits the central theme. Smudges of graphite scattered about the drawings on the expanse of paper circumscribing the image are tell-tale signs of how the work came into being, while at the same time alluding to the disappearance of the principal motifs.

The camera is a democratic instrument that objectivises the individual and tags each unique moment as part of a shared history. Today, when we all know how to look at and read a photographic image, every photograph is part and parcel of our collective memory. When we are photographed we are reduced to icons, and thus will never disappear from the planet although, among the plethora of photographs, our immortality has never been in greater peril.

Albrectsen addresses this dilemma in his recent work. Our visual history is disrupted by the empty space that marks the absence of the main subject we are all too familiar with. It is this absence that generates an entirely new symbolism.

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