Michael Kirkham – Rise and Shine, Saturnine

From Saturday, January 27th, to Saturday, March 3rd, 2018

RISE AND SHINE, SATURNINE

By Michael Kirkham (Blackpool, UK, 1971)
27 January – 3 March 2018
Opening Preview: Saturday 27 January from 17:00 Hours

Gerhard Hofland is proud to present Rise and Shine, Saturnine, the seventh solo-exhibition by Michael Kirkham (Blackpool, UK, 1971) in the gallery. Featuring all new paintings, this is Kirkham’s first solo-exhibition in the gallery since Yield to the Night from 2014.

Often highly regarded for their uncompromising nature, Michael Kirkham’s paintings give a delicate insight into the dark corners of human existence. Painted mostly from the mind, mixing fantasy and reality, Kirkham depicts his subjects in uncomfortable or awkward positions, (half) undressed, engaging in acts of sexual nature, being in love, daydreaming, or showing their genitals. While doing so, the characters in Kirkham’s paintings often appear distant, as if disconnected or sunken into the emptiness of their subconsciousness. In addition to the apathetic character of his subjects, most of Kirkham’s paintings appear covered in an apt layer of misery and ambiguity.

As much as these scenes of the despicable bring about a sense of discomfort or voyeurism to the spectator, they are equally intriguing and touching as they display a deep sense of empathy for all aspects of the human condition. This is Kirkham’s power: rather than depicting scenes that exist only in Kirkham’s own artistic universe, his works show those parts of life that, no matter our attempts to disregard or overlook them, are a core part of contemporary life. They show us the alienated or estranged individuals who are no match for the complexities of the world they themselves have helped to build.

It is in this commentary on the contemporary that any sense of melancholy, irony, or even voyeurism so often related to the Kirkham’s paintings disappears. The power and beauty of his work are inseparable from the discomfort it brings about when it confronts the viewer with the bleakness of humanity. Therefore, any form of sadness, irony, voyeurism, or discomfort felt in Kirkham’s paintings can only be a sign of confrontation, recognition or even emotion of the spectator, pointing out to us what essentially makes us human throughout the complexities of today.

Michael Kirkham (Blackpool, UK, 1971) lives and works in Berlin, Germany. He completed his education at the Glasgow School of Art and De Ateliers, Amsterdam. His work has been exhibited, among many other locations, at Gemeentemuseum, The Hague (NL), Centraal Museum, Utrecht (NL), and Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf (DE), and is part of collections such as the Gemeentemuseum, The Hague (NL), Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam (NL), Centraal Museum, Utrecht (NL), Sammlung Ritter Sport, Stuttgart (DE), Collection Olbricht (DE), Sollection SØR Rusche, De Nederlandsche Bank, Amsterdam (NL), and of private collections in The Netherlands, Germany and the United States, among others.

Download Press Release here

Artists

Michael Kirkham, Obst & Gemüse, Frisch & Verdorben, 2018, oil on canvas, 65 x 80 cm, Collection Centraal Museum, Utrecht

Michael Kirkham, Untitled, 2017, oil on canvas, 65 x 65 cm

Michael Kirkham, Couple at Home #2, 2017, oil on canvas, 115 x 130 cm

Michael Kirkham, Obst & Gemüse, Frisch & Verdorben, 2018, oil on canvas, 65 x 80 cm, Collection Centraal Museum, Utrecht

Michael Kirkham, Untitled, 2017, oil on canvas, 65 x 65 cm

Michael Kirkham, Couple at Home #2, 2017, oil on canvas, 115 x 130 cm

Close
Next
Previous